Virginia Drug Treatment Centers
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Drug Rehab Virginia

Over the years Virginia has steadily been seeing an increase in drug abuse and addiction. Due to this increase the need for successful drug rehab has grown as well. With so many different types of drug rehabs in Virginia the process of choosing which one will be the best fit can be a daunting task. Drug rehab methods range from inpatient care, outpatient care, residential drug rehab, holistic rehab, as well as long term and short term drug rehab programs just to list a few. Making the decision on which type of treatment method in Virginia is best can be made easier by speaking with a highly trained Virginia drug rehab counselor.

No matter which type of Virginia drug rehab you choose, the primary goal should be to help the addict come to a place where they can willingly choose sobriety over an active drug addiction. Getting to that goal can be accomplished in many different ways depending on the drug rehab methods that are utilized in treating the drug addiction. Because every person is unique, a Virginia drug rehab program will be most effective when the drug treatment includes various components that specifically address the personal needs of the individual.

Drug addiction in Virginia takes a devastating toll on the addict and their loved ones. It can strip them of their self esteem, self worth and physical health. Drug addiction also affects society by increasing costs to the state of Virginia for additional law enforcement, drug rehabilitation, and most importantly the cost in terms of human lives. In the state of Virginia, a large percentage of fatal automobile accidents are linked directly to drug abuse. Another negative effect of a drug addiction is the risk of a deadly drug overdose which occurs more often than many realize.

Addiction to drugs in Virginia is nearly impossible to overcome without the help of drug rehab specialists. This is because addiction literally changes the users brain in ways that make "just saying no" seem impossible. The addict may be able to white-knuckle it without drugs or alcohol for a period of time but without the proper education on the causes of drug addiction as well as drug abuse prevention tools they will find themselves right back using once again. With the assistance of a Virginia drug rehab center, an individual has a much greater chance at success in overcoming their drug addiction.

To help ensure a lasting sobriety when choosing a Virginia drug rehab, you should select one with a high success rate as well as excellent credentials. Cost often plays a factor when making a decision but don't let that be the only determining factor. Many Virginia drug rehabs will be willing to work with you on a payment plan. Speaking with a staff member can help to answer your questions and take the guesswork out of choosing the best possible drug rehab option. Drug rehab counselors are experienced in all areas of drug addiction, and can help you by answering any substance abuse questions that you may have regarding attending a Virginia drug treatment center.


  • During 2006, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) made 539 drug arrests in Virginia.
  • During 2006, there were 32,000 total drug arrests in Virginia.16 There were 29,746 drug arrests in the state in 2005.
  • During 2006, the Virginia State Police Pharmaceutical Drug Diversion Unit received 1,939 complaints of diversion activities throughout Virginia. In response to the complaints, 536 investigations were initiated and 397 persons were arrested on 725 charges.
  • There were 8 incidents of murder/non-negligent manslaughter in Virginia where the offender(s) were suspected of using drugs.
  • Both the powder and crack forms of cocaine are prevalent throughout the state of Virginia, in wholesale and retail quantities. Considerable levels of violence continue to be associated with the crack cocaine trade in urban areas.
  • There are stable, long-term heroin abuse populations in the Richmond and Tidewater areas of Virginia. Pockets of heroin distribution are present in other areas of the state as well, but the problem is less pronounced. Most of the heroin encountered in Virginia tends to be of higher-than-average purity.
  • Marijuana is the most widely abused drug in the state of Virginia.
  • The Shenandoah Valley region contains the highest percentage of methamphetamine abusers in the state. Methamphetamine and "ice" have also become drugs of choice at raves and nightclubs.
  • MDMA is the most readily available and frequently abused club drug in Virginia.
  • Pharmaceutical diversion and abuse continue to be a drug threat to Virginia, with OxyContin (both brand name and generic), Percocet, and Dilaudid the most popular.
  • According to 2004-2005 data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), approximately 411,000 (7%) of Virginia citizens (ages 12 or older) reported past month use of an illicit drug.
  • According to the Virginia Community Youth Survey: 2005, 20% of 12th graders reported using marijuana within the past month.
  • Approximately 44% of 12th graders surveyed in 2005 reported using marijuana at least once during their lifetimes.
  • According to 2004-2005 NSDUH data, approximately 8% of Virginia 12-17 year olds reported past month use of an illicit drug.
  • Cities along the I-95 corridor in Virginia are subject to "spillover" drug distribution from traffickers moving between the two major eastern drug importation hubs of New York City and Miami.
  • Mexican trafficking organizations are making enormous inroads in the cocaine, methamphetamine and marijuana distribution markets in nearly every part of the state.
  • While Colombian and Dominican drug trafficking organizations in New York City remain the primary sources for most of the cocaine available in Virginia, many local traffickers are becoming more reliant on Mexican sources of supply.
  • During 2006, Virginia State Police Drug Enforcement (DES) Regional Field Offices seized drugs valued at $16,140,294.
  • Federal agencies seized more than 250 kilograms of cocaine in Virginia during 2006.
  • During 2006, there were 23 methamphetamine laboratories incidents in Virginia reported by the DEA and state and local authorities.
  • During 2006, 20,001 cultivated marijuana plants were eradicated in Virginia as part of the DEA's Domestic Cannabis Eradication/Suppression Program.
  • During 2005, authorities reported that there were 19 children affected by methamphetamine laboratories in Virginia.
  • During 2006, there were 35,197 admissions to drug/alcohol treatment in Virginia. This is a decrease from the 36,878 admissions during 2005. In 2004, there were 57,435 admissions to drug/alcohol treatment in the state.
  • According to 2004-2005 NSDUH data, approximately 136,000 (2.24%) Virginia citizens reported needing but not receiving treatment for illicit drug use within the past year.

Get help for you or your loved one and find the Virginia drug rehab program needed to recover from drug . Please call and receive immediate help. Drug addiction does not have to be part of your life any longer...make the call now.

Virginia Drug Information and Drug Trafficking

In the past, the mid-Atlantic region has served as a thoroughfare for drugs, drug-related proceeds, weapons, and other contraband traveling along the east coast of the United States. Virginia cities situated along Interstate-95 are vulnerable to "spillover" drug distribution from traffickers moving between the two major eastern drug importation hubs of New York City and Miami. Cocaine, crack cocaine, and the violence attendant with the trafficking of these drugs are the most significant drug problem in the state, according to most law enforcement sources. Nevertheless, MDMA abuse and distribution is an already large and still-growing problem, seizures of clandestine methamphetamine laboratories increase every year, and Mexican trafficking organizations are making enormous inroads in the cocaine, methamphetamine, and marijuana distribution markets in nearly every part of the state.

Drug information sources in Virginia share that cocaine in both powder and crack forms is prevalent throughout the state, in both wholesale and retail quantities. Considerable levels of violence continue to be associated with the crack cocaine trade in urban areas. Colombian and Dominican drug trafficking organizations in New York City remain the primary sources for most of the cocaine available in Virginia. Nonetheless, many local traffickers are becoming more reliant on Mexican sources of supply in the southwestern U.S., North Carolina, and Georgia.

Virginia drug information shows that the Richmond and Tidewater areas of Virginia both boast a consistent, long-term heroin abuse population. Pockets of heroin distribution are present in other areas of the state as well, but the problem is less pronounced. In recent years, "experimental" use of heroin by younger drug users was on the rise, but appears to have stabilized. Most of the heroin encountered in Virginia tends to be of higher-than-average purity. In the Norfolk area, heroin is packaged primarily in gelatin capsules, while it is packaged in small, usually colored or marked ziploc baggies in other parts of the state.

Although still minimal, localized clandestine manufacture of methamphetamine has increased in Virginia every year for the past several years, with most of the activity centered on the far southwestern corner of the state bordering West Virginia, North Carolina, and Kentucky. The Shenandoah Valley region contains the highest percentage of methamphetamine abusers in the state, and was the first area of the state to receive a huge influx of Mexican immigrants, whose presence encouraged an expansion of existing Mexican drug-trafficking networks. In rave and nightclub venues, both "ice" and methamphetamine have become drugs of choice.

Drug information from Virginia notes that of the club drugs widely abused and available within the state, MDMA is by far the easiest to obtain and most in demand. Once limited to abuse among teen and young-adult "ravers" from the affluent Washington, DC suburbs, MDMA is now a drug of choice among young adult drug users throughout the state, regardless of socio-economic and ethnic background. GHB and Ketamine are also widely available but unlike MDMA, tend to remain within the nightclub/rave community. Other hallucinogenic and stimulant drugs, such as the piperazines, psilocybin mushrooms, LSD, and PCP are also available, with their abuse tending to exhibit cyclical patterns or be limited to particular venues and/or events.

Marijuana is the most widely abused drug in the state of Virginia. Most of the marijuana available in the state is commercial grade product, imported from the southwestern U.S. Demand for high-grade marijuana, however, is at extremely high levels with source areas ranging from the Pacific Northwest to the New England states. Outdoor marijuana cultivation flourishes during the spring and summer, and indoor grows are increasingly common. Hydroponic indoor grows have not been encountered.

Virginia is one of the half-dozen or so states commonly cited by law enforcement and medical practitioners when discussing the national OxyContin abuse "epidemic." Indeed, Virginia was one of the first states to record extraordinary levels of OxyContin diversion and abuse. Although abuse of the prescription painkiller was initially limited to users in the southwestern portion of the state, that abuse has spread to include most of western Virginia and much of central and northern Virginia as well. Sources for diverted OxyContin are located both within and outside of Virginia's borders. The diversion and abuse of other prescription drugs has a long history in Virginia, particularly in the southwestern portion of the state.

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  • Virginia Facts
  • In Virginia, 21% of the substance abuse treatment being received was from residential care (National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS)).
  • In 2005 there were 5,024 drug arrests made for crack cocaine in Virginia.
  • 40.4% of the federally sentenced defendants in Virginia in 2006 had committed a drug offense.
  • In Virginia it was estimated on a survey-weighted hierarchical Bayes estimation approach that the total number of individuals with an alcohol addiction or alcohol abuse problem over an one year period was 433,000 (Annual Averages Based on 2002 and 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health).
  • Virginia, Statistics
  • The population of Virginia is 7,077,709 with 3,471,494 Males and 3,606,215 Females.

    The population of Virginia, breaks down into the following age groups:

    Under Age 5: 461,948
    Age 5-9: 495,048
    Age 10-14: 495,898
    Age 15-19: 484,005
    Age 20-24: 480,541
    Age 25-34: 1,036,868
    Age 35-44: 1,200,564
    Age 45-54: 999,130
    Age 55-59: 358,371
    Age 60-64: 273,123
    Age 65-74: 432,395
    Age 75-84: 272,566
    Over 85: 87,252

    The Median age in Virginia, is 39.0

    Virginia Summary
    Virginia Area - 39590.9 Sq. Miles
    Land - 39238.17 Sq. Miles
    Water - 352.73 Sq. Miles

    The population Density in Virginia is 180.38 People per Sq. Mile
    Elevation of Virginia - 692 Feet
    Timezone - Eastern (GMT -5)

    Virginia School Enrollment Breakdown
    Age 3 and Over enrolled in Virginia schools - 1,867,978
    Virginia children enrolled in Nursery or Preschool - 125,688
    Children in Virginia enrolled in Kindergarten - 101,127
    Virginia children enrolled in Elementary School - 806,394
    Virginia Highschool Enrollment - 383,993
    Virginia College Enrollment - 450,776

    Virginia Economy and Employment
    Employment Breakdown:
    16 years and over - 5,529,405
    Total Males in Work Force in Virginia - 1,964,405
    Total Females in Work Force in Virginia - 1,729,879

    Occupation Breakdown in Virginia:
    Management and Professional Occupation related jobs in Virginia - 1,304,809
    Service related jobs in Virginia - 468,111
    Sales and Office Related jobs in Virginia - 868,437
    Forestry, Farming and Fishing related jobs in Virginia - 16,336
    Construction and Maintenance related jobs in Virginia - 327,686
    Production and Transportation related jobs in Virginia - 426,914

    Virginia Houselhold Income Breakdown:
    Household Income-
    Less than $10,000 - 214,054
    $10,000.00 - $14,999 - 141,912
    $15,000 - $24,999 - 308,470
    $25,000 - $34,999 - 326,800
    $35,000 - $49,999 - 444,628
    $50,000 - $74,999 - 549,336
    $75,000 - $99,999 - 307,102
    $100,000 - $149,999 - 254,927
    $150,000 - $199,999 - 80,042
    $200,000 or more - 72,763
    Average Household Income in Virginia - $42,024.41
    Average Household Size in Virginia - 2.50

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